Local History Thursday: Evoking Grand Junction’s History with Radio History Theater

In 1981, coinciding with Grand Junction’s centennial celebration, the Mesa County Oral History Project (MCOHP) produced forty-eight radio plays about local history. Over forty-eight weeks, these plays aired on radio stations KSTR, KREX-AM, KREX-FM, and KMSA, with the last play broadcasting on August 21, 1982. Now, the Radio History Theater plays have been digitized and […]

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Local History Thursday: Dr. Hannah Marie Wormington

In the Denver Museum of Nature and Science Annals, Dr. Hannah Marie Wormington is described as, “Precocious. Audacious. Gifted. Prolific. Ambitious. Connected. Cavalier. Regal. Fiery. Intelligent. Generous. Opinionated.” She was a woman who studied and worked hard to stand out and have her voice heard in a profession full of men, and in the realm […]

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Local History Thursday: The Teller Institute, Grand Junction’s American Indian School

With the gruesome discovery of the bodies of First Nations children on the grounds of residential schools in Canada, people are also turning their attention to American Indian schools in the United States. These boarding schools operated in the late 1800’s and 1900’s. They were dedicated to the forced acculturation of Native American children, who […]

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Local History Thursday: Shannon Robinson And Right & Wrong

Shannon Robinson has led a brave and transformational life in Grand Junction. She overcame racism from some fellow students to become the first African-American president of student government at Mesa State College (now Colorado Mesa University). In the midst of the AIDS epidemic, she helped stage on-campus demonstrations to educate students about the dangers of […]

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Local History Thursday: Here’s the Scoop

These 90 degree temperatures have kicked ice cream cravings into high gear. According to the International Dairy Foods Association, ice cream is a commodity that was first documented in America around 1744.  It was originally a treat of the elite, its cool flavors only to be enjoyed by the rich.  Time and technological advances changed […]

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Local History Thursday: Cowgirl Marie Young

Ahh the Wild West.  Tumbleweeds, dry and dusty landscapes, cactus, cowboys chewing on straw and riding horses across the desert… A less featured but equally important symbol of the American West is that of the cowgirl. Annie Oakley and Lucille Mulhall were two tough women who became nationally known for their lassoing, riding skills and […]

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