Literary Western

A long list of American fiction shows that our large diverse American landscape and frontier mind-set wield strong influence on our narratives and stories. Current day writers in this tradition include Gregory Hill (East of Denver), Ron Carlson (Return to Oakpine), and other familiar names such as Kent Haruf, Ivan Doig, Cormac McCarthy, and William […]

Continue reading

The End of Your Life Book Club

The library’s Kiva Book Club read Will Schawalbe’s The End of Your Life Book Club this month and we had a very lively discussion. Schwalbe and his mother are readers, and as such, they relate to one another best through what they have been, are reading or intend to read. Once his mother is diagnosed […]

Continue reading

The birth of Pooh

I squeaked with joy when I saw this book on  Booklist Reader :  Winnie: The True Story of the Bear Who Inspired Winnie-the-Pooh  by Sally M. Walker.  Although it’s a children’s book, it appealed to me because of the cover art of a bear snuggling with a soldier and my abiding affection for Winnie the Pooh. It all […]

Continue reading

Wild Reads

We just celebrated the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act and here at the Mesa County Libraries, we had a lovely display of John Fielder’s framed photographs on our walls. With all the interest, I wanted to share a list of wonderful Wild Reads that someone graciously shared with me. This was compiled by Southpark, […]

Continue reading

Romantic historical novels-without bodice ripping

Timeless love stories, set in long-ago times, never go out of style.  Here are a few suggestions for those who like historical fiction spiced with some romantic longing. Longbourn by Jo Baker  tells of Sarah, a young housemaid working in the tumultuous household of the  Bennet family from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice.  This novel combines the […]

Continue reading

Delicious! reading

Delicious! is the yummy first novel by Ruth Reichl, the former editor of Gourmet magazine,   The intricate story-within-a-story follows a young woman embarking on a much-coveted job at a gourmet food magazine.  This book is an entertaining page-turner for foodies and non-foodies alike. Reichl also wrote an engaging and poignant 3-part memoir (Tender at the Bone, Comfort […]

Continue reading

Minimalism at its bare minimum

Some recent new books are fascinating for the brevity of their one-letter titles.   F, a novel by Daniel Kehlmann, published August 2014, was reviewed by James Wood in the New Yorker. He writes that F can seem a conventional tale of family woes, shaped around the life stories of the three failed Friedland brothers, […]

Continue reading

Healthy Resolutions? Check this out!

It’s January, a time when many of us take a look at how we might make some healthy changes in our lives.  Consumer Health Complete is available 24/7 from home with your library card!  Check out popular magazines like Shape and Men’s Fitness, search videos and animation, learn more about medications and natural alternatives and […]

Continue reading

Suspenseful gothic thrills

When a vulnerable young woman wakes up in the locked room of an insane asylum, with no memory of how she got there, the only thing she knows for sure is that she is Georgina Ferrars who lives in London with her uncle.  And that is the one thing, it seems, that is quite impossible. […]

Continue reading

Parting Gifts

The time has come, my three loyal readers.  This will be Cinephile Femme’s final blog post here at Mesa County Libraries.  In honor of this bittersweet occasion, I have compiled 10 of my very favorite closing lines in cinema history.  They aren’t necessarily the most famous (see: “Louie, I think this is the beginning of […]

Continue reading